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What type of mood are you in today?

People in sad moods tend to value familiarity whereas those in a happy mood are more open and welcoming of novelty. Why? “Bad mood signals a problem, tuning individuals toward safety concerns, whereas good mood signals that an environment is benign… After all, familiarity is only a heuristic cue to safety.”

People often prefer familiar stimuli, presumably because familiarity signals safety. This preference can occur with merely repeated old stimuli, but it is most robust with new but highly familiar rototypes of a known category (beauty-in-averageness effect). However, is familiarity always warm? Tuning accounts of mood hold that positive mood signals a safe environment, whereas negative mood signals an unsafe environment. Thus, the value of familiarity should depend on mood. We show that compared with a sad mood, a happy mood eliminates the preference for familiar stimuli, as shown in measures of self-reported liking and physiological measures of affect (electromyographic indicator of spontaneous smiling). The basic effect of exposure on preference and its modulation by mood were most robust for prototypes (category averages). All this occurs even though prototypes might be more familiar in a happy mood. We conclude that mood changes the hedonic implications of familiarity cues.

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Source: Happiness Cools the Warm Glow of Familiarity: Psychophysiological Evidence That Mood Modulates the Familiarity-Affect Link Marieke de Vries, Rob W. Holland, Troy Chenier, Mark J. Starr and Piotr Winkielman, Psychological Science

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