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The danger of storytelling

Tyler Cowen

We tell ourselves stories in order to live.” – Joan Didion

Tyler Cowen with an excellent TEDtalk on the dangers of storytelling:

So if I’m thinking about this talk, I’m wondering, of course, what is it you take away from this talk? What story do you take away from Tyler Cowen? One story you might take away is the story of the quest. “Tyler came here, and he told us not to think so much in terms of stories.” That would be a story you could tell about this talk. It would fit a pretty well-known pattern. You might remember it. You could tell it to other people. “This weird guy came, and he said not to think in terms of stories. Let me tell you what happened today!” and you tell your story. Another possibility is you might tell a story of rebirth. You might say, “I used to think too much in terms of stories, but then I heard Tyler Cowen, and now I think less in terms of stories!” That too, is a narrative you will remember, you can tell to other people, and it may stick. You also could tell a story of deep tragedy. “This guy Tyler Cowen came and he told us not to think in terms of stories, but all he could do was tell us stories about how other people think too much in terms of stories.”

As a simple rule of thumb, just imagine every time you’re telling a good vs. evil story, you’re basically lowering your I.Q. by ten points or more.

Still curious? Read a copy of the transcript.