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Life Changing Books (New Guy Edition)

Back in 2013, I posted the Books that Changed my Life. In doing so, I was responding to a reader request to post up the books that “literally changed my life.”

Now that we have Jeff on board, I’ve asked him to do the same. Here are his choices, presented in a somewhat chronological order. As always, these lists leave off a lot of important books in the name of brevity.

Rich Dad, Poor Dad – Robert Kiyosaki

Before I get hanged for apostasy, let me explain. The list is about books that changed my life and this one absolutely did. I pulled this off my father’s shelf and read it in high school, and it kicked off a lifelong interest in investments, business, and the magic of compound interest. That eventually led me to find Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger, affecting the path of my life considerably. With that said, I would probably not recommend you start here. I haven’t re-read the book since high school and what I’ve learned about Kiyosaki doesn’t make me want to recommend anything to you from him. But for better or worse, this book had an impact. Another one that probably holds up better is The Millionaire Next Door, which my father recommended when I was in high school and stuck with me for a long time too.

Buffett: Making of an American Capitalist/Buffett’s Letters to Shareholders – Roger Lowenstein, Warren Buffett

These two and the next book are duplicates off Shane’s list, but they are also probably the reason we know each other. Learning about Warren Buffett took the kid who liked “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” and watched The Apprentice, and might have been on a path to highly leveraged real estate speculation and who knows what else, and put him on a more sound path. I read this biography many times in college, and decided I wanted to emulate some of Buffett’s qualities. (I actually now prefer The Snowball, by Alice Schroeder, but Lowenstein’s came first and changed my life more.) Although I have a business degree, I learned a lot more from reading and applying the collected Letters to Shareholders.

Poor Charlie’s Almanack – Peter Kaufman, Charlie Munger et al.

The Almanack is the greatest book I have ever read, and I knew it from the first time I read it. As Charlie says in the book, there is no going back from the multi-disciplinary approach. It would feel like cutting off your hands. I re-read this book every year in whole or in part, and so far, 8 years on, I haven’t failed to pick up a meaningful new insight. Like any great book, it grows as you grow. I like to think I understand about 40% of it on a deep level now, and I hope to add a few percent every year. I literally cannot conceive of a world in which I didn’t read this.

The Nurture Assumption – Judith Rich Harris

This book affected my thinking considerably. I noticed in the Almanack that Munger recommended this book and another, No Two Alike, towards the end. Once I read it, I could see why. It is a monument to clear and careful thinking. Munger calls the author Judith Rich Harris a combination of Darwin and Sherlock Holmes, and he’s right. If this book doesn’t change how you think about parenting, social development, peer pressure, education, and a number of other topics, then re-read it.

Filters Against Folly/Living within Limits – Garrett Hardin

Like The Nurture Assumption, these two books are brilliantly well thought-through. Pillars of careful thought. It wasn’t until years after I read them that I realized Garrett Hardin was friends with, and in fact funded by, Charlie Munger. The ideas about overpopulation in Living within Limits made a deep impression on me, but the quality of thought in general hit me the hardest. Like the Almanack, it made me want to become a better and more careful thinker.

The Black Swan – Nassim Taleb

Who has read this and not been affected by it? Like many, Nassim’s books changed how I think about the world. The ideas from The Black Swan and Fooled by Randomness about the narrative fallacy and the ludic fallacy cannot be forgotten, as well as the central idea of the book itself that rare events are not predictable and yet dominate our landscape. Also, Nassim’s writing style made me realize deep, practical writing didn’t have to be dry and sanitized. Like him or not, he wears his soul on his sleeve.

Good Calories, Bad Calories / Why We Get Fat: And What to do About it – Gary Taubes

I’ve been interested in nutrition since I was young, and these books made me realize most of what I knew was not very accurate. Gary Taubes is a scientific journalist of the highest order. Like Hardin, Munger, and Harris, he thinks much more carefully than most of his peers. Nutrition is a field that is still sort of growing up, and the quality of the research and thought shows it. Taubes made me recognize that nutrition can be a real science if it’s done more carefully, more Feynman-like. Hopefully his NuSi initiative will help shove the field in the right direction.

The (Honest) Truth about Dishonesty – Dan Ariely

This book by Ariely was a game-changer in that it helped me realize the extent to which we rationalize our behavior in a million little ways. I had a lot of nights thinking about my own propensity for dishonesty and cheating after I read this one, and I like to think I’m a pretty moral person to start with. I had never considered how situational dishonesty was, but now that I do, I see it constantly in myself and others. There are also good sections on incentive-caused bias and social pressure that made an impact.

Sapiens – Yuval Noah Harrari

This is fairly new so I’m still digesting this book, and I have a feeling it will take many years. But Sapiens has a lot of (for me) deep insights about humanity and how we got here. I think Yuval is a very good thinker and an excellent writer. A lot of the ideas in this book will set some people off, and not in a good way. But that doesn’t mean they’re not correct. Highly recommended if you’re open-minded and want to learn.

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At the end of the day, what gets me excited is my Antilibrary, all the books I have on my shelf or on my Amazon wish list that I haven’t read yet. The prospect of reading another great book that changes my life like these books did is an exciting quest.