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Joseph Tussman: Getting the World to Do the Work for You

Nothing better sums up the ethos of Farnam Street than this quote by Joseph Tussman.

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tussman

How’s that for a guiding principle?

Tussman was a philosophy professor at Cal Berkley and an educational reformer. We got this wonderful quote from a friend of ours in California. Isn’t it brilliant?

Reality will do a lot of the work for us if we simply align with it, and stop fighting it because we want the world to work another way. What Tussman really does is identify a leverage point.

Leverage amplifies an input to provide a greater output. There are leverage points in all systems. To know the leverage point is to know where to apply your effort. Focusing on the leverage point will yield non-linear results. Doesn’t that sound like something we want to look for?

Working hard and being busy is not enough. Most people are taking two steps forward and one step back. They’re busy but they haven’t moved anywhere.

We need to work smarter not harder.

What Tussman has done is identify a leverage point in life. One that will increase what you can accomplish (through tailwinds) and reduced friction. When we work smart rather than hard we apply energy in the same direction.

The person who needs a new mental tool and doesn’t have it is already paying for it. This is how we should be thinking about the acquisition of worldly wisdom. We’re like plumbers who show up with a lot of wrenches but no blowtorches, and our results largely reflect that. We get the job half done in twice the time.

A better approach is the one Tussman suggests. Learn from the world. The best way to identify how the world really works is to find the general principles that line up with historically significant sample sizes — those that apply, in the words of Peter Kaufman, “across the geological time scale of human, organic, and inorganic history.”

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Still Curious? Pair with Andy Benoit’s wisdom and make some time to think about them.