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Category Archives: Member Content

Don’t Let Your (Technology) Tools Use You

HERBERT SIMON 2

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A shovel is just a shovel. You shovel things with it. You can break up weeds and dirt. (You can also whack someone with it.) I’m not sure I’ve seen a shovel used for much else.

Modern technological tools aren’t really like that.

What is an iPhone, functionally? Sure, it’s a got the phone thing down, but it’s also a GPS, a note-taker, an emailer, a text messager, a newspaper, a video-game device, a taxi-calling service, a flashlight, a web browser, a library, a book…you get the point. It does a lot.

This all seems pretty wonderful. To perform those functions 20 years ago, you needed a map and a sense of direction, a notepad, a personal computer, a cell phone, an actual newspaper, a Playstation, a phone and the willingness to talk to a person, an actual flashlight, an actual library, an actual book…you get the point. Basically, as Mark Andressen puts it, the world is being eaten by software. One simple (looking) device and a host of software can perform the functions served by a bunch of big clunky tools of the past.

So far, we’ve been convinced that usage of the New Tools is mostly “upside,” that our embrace of them should be wholehearted. Much of this is for good reason. Do you remember how awful using a map was? Yuck.

The problem is that our New Tools are winning the battle of attention. We’ve gotten to the point where the tools use us as much as we use them. This new reality means we need to re-examine our relationship with our New Tools.

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Why Fiddling With Prices Doesn’t Work

The fact is, if you don't find it reasonable that prices should reflect relative scarcity,
then fundamentally you don't accept the market economy,
because this is about as close to the essence of the market as you can find.

— Joseph Heath

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Inevitably, when the price of a good or service rises rapidly, there follows an accusation of price-gouging. The term carries a strong moral admonition on the price-gouger, in favor of the price-gougee. Gas shortages are a classic example. With a local shortage of gasoline, gas stations will tend to mark up the price of gasoline to reflect the supply issue. This is usually rewarded with cries of unfairness. But does that really make sense?

In his excellent book Economics Without Illusions, Joseph Heath argues that it doesn't.

In fact, this very scenario is market pricing reacting just as it should. With gasoline in short supply, the market price rises too so that those who need gasoline have it available, and those who simply want it do not. The price system ensures that everyone makes their choice correctly. If you're willing to pay up, you pay up. If you're not, you make alternative arrangements – drive less, use less heat, etc. This is exactly what market pricing is for – to give us a reference as we make our choices. But it's still hard for many well-intentioned people to understand. Let's think it through a little, with Heath's help.

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The Narrative Fallacy and What You Can Do About It

“These types of stories strike a deep chord: They give us deep, affecting reasons on which to hang our understanding of reality. They help us make sense of our own lives. And, most importantly, they frequently cause us to believe we can predict the future. The problem is, most of them are a sham.”

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The Narrative Fallacy

A typical biography starts by describing the subject’s young life, trying to show how the ultimate painting began as just a sketch. In Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs, for example, Isaacson determines that Jobs’s success was determined to a great degree by the childhood  influence of his father, a careful, detailed-oriented engineer and craftsman – Paul Jobs would carefully craft the backs of fences and cabinets even if no one would see – who Jobs later found out was not his biological father. The combination of his adoption and his craftsman father planted the seeds of Steve’s adult personality: his penchant for design detail, his need to prove himself, his messianic zeal. The recent movie starring Michael Fassbender especially plays up the latter cause; Jobs’s feeling of abandonment drove his success. Fassbender’s emotional portrayal earned him an Oscar nomination.

Nassim Taleb describes a memorable experience of a similar type in his book The Black Swan. He’s in Rome having an animated discussion with a professor who has read Nassim’s first book Fooled by Randomness, parts of which promote the idea that our mind creates more cause-and-effect links than reality would support. The professor proceeds to congratulate Nassim on his great luck by being born in Lebanon:

…had you grown up in a Protestant society where people are told that efforts are linked to rewards and individual responsibility is emphasized, you would never have seen the world in such a manner. You were able to see luck and separate cause and effect because of your Eastern Orthodox Mediterranean heritage. 

These types of stories strike a deep chord: They give us deep, affecting reasons on which to hang our understanding of reality. They help us make sense of our own lives. And, most importantly, they frequently cause us to believe we can predict the future. The problem is, most of them are a sham.

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Charlie Munger on the Medical System

Long a fount of wisdom, Charlie Munger provided us fascinating insight on everything from energy policy and mental models to how good gamblers think and making effective decisions.

At the Daily Journal Meeting (held March 25th 2015), Munger answered a question on Obamacare:

Of course the system of medical care, as evolved under the United States, has much wrong with it.

On the other hand, it has much that's good about it. All the new drugs and devices, and new operations, medicine has taken more territory in my lifetime than it took in the whole previous history of mankind. It's just amazing what's been done.

A lot of it is obvious and simple, like inoculating the children against infantile paralysis, scraping the tartar off your teeth so you don't wear plates when you're 55 years old, and so on. People now take those benefits for granted, but I lived in a world where a lot of children died. Every city had a tuberculosis sanitarium, and half the people who got tuberculosis died. It's amazing how well medicine has worked.

On the other hand, compared to the best it can possibly be, the American system is pretty peculiar. It's very hard to fix. One kind of insanity is to say, “We'll pay you so much a month for taking care of the people, and everything you save is yours.”

That is the system the government uses in dealing with the convalescent homes. That's a great name, a convalescent home. You convalesce in heaven. You don't convalesce them at home. [laughs] It's attempting to have a euphemistic name.

That creates huge incentives to delay care and keep the money. The government has strict rules, compliance systems, and so forth. If we didn't have that system, the cost of taking care of the old people in convalescent homes would be 10 times what it is. It was the only feasible solution.

The rest of the world is going in that direction, because the costs just keep rising and rising and rising.

If the government is going to pay A anything he wants for selling services to B, who doesn't have to pay anything, of course the system is going to create a lot of unnecessary tests, unnecessary costs, unnecessary procedures, unnecessary interventions.
Psychiatrists that keep talking to a patient forever and ever with no improvement, of course that system is going to cause problems. The alternative system also causes problems.

Add the fact you've got politicians and add the fact you've got existing players who are enormously rich and powerful, who lobby you like crazy. A state legislature, now, is just 19 percent or whatever it is of GDP going to the medical system, imagine what the lobbying is like.

We get these Rube Goldberg systems. We get a lot of abuse of various kinds. There's hardly an ethical drug company that hasn't created multiple gross abuses, which are in substance growing through the bribery of doctors, which, of course, is illegal.
You have all these ethical companies. Ethical meaning it's the designation of a drug company that has patented drugs. They’ve all committed big follies. The device makers of anything have been worse. There's been a lot of abuse and craziness, and the costs, of course, just keep rising and rising.

That's in a system that every child has been the greatest achiever in the history of the world. It's very complicated. I think it will get addressed more because…We probably will end up with systems that are more like we do with the convalescent homes.
If you look at medicine, what's happening is that more and more they're going to a system where they pay somebody X dollars and everything they save, they keep. That system has some chance of controlling the cost. If you go into a great medical school hospital today, and you're within a day of dying of some obvious thing like advanced cancer, the admitting physician is very likely to ask for a test of your cholesterol or any other damn thing. All the bills go to the government. As long as the incentives allow that, people will do it and they'll rationalize their behavior. Something has to be done along that and more than is now being done.

I think the drift will be more in the direction of the block care. I don't see any other system that would have controlled cost in the convalescent homes.

By the way, your doctor can't just walk by every bed in the convalescent home and send the bill to the government. That's not allowed by the law. But if you transfer the patient into a hospital, he can walk by the bed five times every day and send a $45 bill to the government.

If the incentives are wrong, the behavior will be wrong. I guarantee it. Not by everybody, but by enough of a percentage that you won't like the system.

I think that's enough on a subject that's so difficult. I think we can see where it's going. We may end up with a whole system that's…In the Netherlands, they have a system where the same people are giving a free system to everybody and a concierge system to the others. It's working pretty well.

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